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Books, Film & Television.

#1 by phil ( deleted ) , Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:48 pm

Do you have a favourite book, have you seen a good film or television programme. If so don't keep it to yourself. Tell us about it.


Make Love, Not War

phil

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#2 by PJ , Fri Jan 01, 2010 6:35 pm

The Guns OF Navarone (1961)
I stumbeld on it by accident this afternoon.
I cant remember how many times I've saw it before, but what a complete well made story, and what a great cast, it had everything I needed for this afternoon, plus a glass of red wine.
I didn't have to think about anything, just enjoy.
The old ones are the best.


PJ  
PJ
Posts: 240
Date registered 12.27.2009

Last edited 01.01.2010 | Top

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#3 by phil ( deleted ) , Fri Jan 01, 2010 7:28 pm

PJ

You have to go a long way to beat Alistair MacLean in writing novels. I think pretty near most of them have been filmed over the years.

Phil


Make Love, Not War

phil
Last edited Sat Jan 02, 2010 10:30 am | Top

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#4 by Deleted User , Fri Jan 01, 2010 7:48 pm

I read plenty of gardening books.

Love the thrillers by Ruth Rendell,PD JAMES.

Now and again re read Agatha Christie.

Recently enjoying Dan Brown.

Maeve Binchy is high on my list,a lot of tales of Irishfolk,girlie books really.


RE: Books, Film & Television.

#5 by Sheldonboy , Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:08 am

PJ I must say when I get a chance I enjoy some of the old films.
The Dambusters, Colditz, The old war films some shot on a lake. Corny old films maybe, but at least the Actors and actresses new their stuff. I am not too interested in modern films. Too many skiny birds. SB


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RE: Books, Film & Television.

#6 by Sheldonboy , Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:13 am

I have always enjoyed agatha Christie books, I don't like the way they were treated by television though they made them look stupid, most anyway in my opinion.

A book I really enjoyed which was I think the funniest I have ever read was By David Niven. The Moons a balloon, this was very funny, his autobigraphy if I remember correctly. I think the sequal was The Ballon goes up. Not sure about that one though. SB


If all else fails Read the instructions

Show me a sane man and I will cure him for you. Carl Gustav Jung

 
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RE: Books, Film & Television.

#7 by PJ , Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:58 pm

It must 30+ years ago when I read it, J P Dunlevy's Ginger Man, so much has changed since then it might not be seen as funny, the main character Sebastian Dangerfield takes liberties with life, women and the world.
I did laugh then, but who knows now.

PJ  
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Date registered 12.27.2009


RE: Books, Film & Television.

#8 by phil ( deleted ) , Fri Jan 08, 2010 4:04 pm

I really used to enjoy Dennis Wheatley novels. I found them most engrossing and didn't like to be interrupted whilst reading them. I was also fascinated reading about his own life and found it strange really because he was the antithesis of everything I esteemed at that point in my life.

Phil


Make Love, Not War

phil

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#9 by Sheldonboy , Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:09 pm

I did read a couple of Dennis Wheatley books, one I remember was The Devil rides out. It's many years since I read it but it was a very good read. SB


If all else fails Read the instructions

Show me a sane man and I will cure him for you. Carl Gustav Jung

 
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RE: Books, Film & Television.

#10 by phil ( deleted ) , Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:53 pm

SB

That was one in the Duc de Richleau series. I was such a fan I remember all his heroes. There was also Roger Brook, Gregory Sallust, and a few of Julian Day. He certainly could spin a tale, but he had a tendency to waffle a bit.

Phil


Make Love, Not War

phil

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#11 by PJ , Sat Jan 09, 2010 5:45 pm

Yes SB I read the DEVIL RIDES OUT, and like you Phil I thought he waffled a bit.

PJ  
PJ
Posts: 240
Date registered 12.27.2009


RE: Books, Film & Television.

#12 by phil ( deleted ) , Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:22 am

PJ

Yes as much as I liked his writing, I think that if he had cut down on his waffle that his books would have been far more enjoyable and interesting. I think that he just like to let the reader know that he was quite intelligent.

Phil


Make Love, Not War

phil

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#13 by Deleted User , Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:48 am

Watched survivors last night,bit dissapointed,not as good as the first series in my opinion.

Bit too heavy on action and not enough about the characters if you get what I mean.

Must say impressed by sky news and the coverage of the problems with the snow.


RE: Books, Film & Television.

#14 by signman ( deleted ) , Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:17 am

Morning all,
My favourite book of all time is BLUE HIGHWAYS by WILLIAM LEAST HEAT MOON, about his travels in an old van across America on the roads marked in blue on the old maps, hence the title.
It satisfies the wanderlust in me and I've read it 3 times with a Rand Mcnally USA map in front of me retracing every mile (sad), I've even driven some of it.
Filmwise- any road film , I hate fims that are fimed in the dark like a lot of fims used to be at one time, don't like war fims, or westerns, or historical pageants, (don't leave much does it), one of my favourite films is END OF THE AFFAIR filmed partly in Brighton, and I was security on the pier at the time, and watched them making it, good story, good acting, good author, Graham Greene.
TVwise I like AUF WEIDERSEN and most documenteries, any GOOD comedy series and anything to do with travel I even like a few cookery shows.


signman
Last edited Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:18 am | Top

RE: Books, Film & Television.

#15 by phil ( deleted ) , Fri Jan 15, 2010 2:05 pm

John

I remember watching a film once (if that’s the word). It was called The Legions Last Patrol. I think it starred Stewart Grainger. It was an unremarkable film made worse by the fact that it was in the dark 90% of the time and you just couldn't watch it.

The only thing that stopped me walking out was the remarkable theme tune. It was a trumpet solo. It wasn’t until I got a computer that I was able to get hold of a copy of the tune.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_9TYQDTvJQ

This is it on YouTube, It set to some flyers personal memories but it’s still a good track.

Phil


Make Love, Not War

phil
Last edited Fri Jan 15, 2010 2:06 pm | Top

   

Birmingham - the Workshop of The world -- A book review

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