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Transport in Birmingham

#1 by Sheldonboy , Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:28 pm

BIRMINGHAM TRAMS
One comment I have heard said for years is what a great shame the Tram line wasn't kept open to the Lickey Hills, what a great tourist attraction that would be. Not only would visitors come to see the Trams but a transport Museum could have been sited along the way. Also there could have been a greater place made of the Lickeys and other sites along the way. I'm sure it could have been staffed by volunteers, there must be many Tram enthusiasts who would give their right arms to drive a Tram or act as a Conductor. SB


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Last edited 08.09.2016 | Top

RE: Birmingham Transport

#2 by PJ , Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:53 pm

SB, I can remember the Trams as they run up from Town to Spring Hill and beyond. The clatter and squeal of the wheels. I can only have been young, I remember my Mother taking me or maybe for herself to Dr, Cocklans surgery virtually opposite Spring Hill Library.

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RE: Birmingham Transport

#3 by phil ( deleted ) , Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:48 pm

SB

I like the thought of the trams operating along the Bristol Rd once again. Just look at the attention they get in places like Blackpool. I'm sure that you are right and it would generate some tourist interest and perhaps it would breathe some life back into the Lickeys.

I fear its the place is so little used that they will be building houses or Swiss type chalets on there soon.

Another thing I would like to see is Landau type carriages pulled by horses. I know that our roads are much too busy for them unlike other towns where I have seen them operated. But I have never understood why some enterprising person has never set up operation in one our premier parks like Cannon Hill or Sutton Coldfield. I'm sure it could be made to pay.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#4 by Sheldonboy , Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:57 pm

I think the idea of the carriages in Sutton Park would be fantastic. Running from Sutton park gate to the various restaurants, lakes etc would be a very useful attraction and I would think over time it could be self financing. These are used to great effect on the Isle of Wight at Osborne House. (Designed By Prince Albert for Queen Victoria).


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#5 by phil ( deleted ) , Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:04 pm

SB

The biggest problem would be The Parks Department. They would want that much of a cut, it would make the whole idea prohibitive.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#6 by Sheldonboy , Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:13 pm

I don't know about you but I was thinking about them running it, as stabling etc would be required. I thought it would be a good idea for the city. SB


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#7 by phil ( deleted ) , Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:27 pm

SB

But thats not the way the City operates, any high risk venture is put out to tender. If you notice in our parks all the café's restaurant's, ice cream vendors, and rides, and I think even the boating now are privately owned businesses and therefore no financial risk to the city.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#8 by Sheldonboy , Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:30 pm

Very true. Are you thinking of tendering?


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#9 by phil ( deleted ) , Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:54 pm

SB

I'm a bit too old to start learning about horses an carriages, but I think if I were 10 or 15 years younger I could rough together a working proposal to the Parks Department. I also think it would be quite a costly venture from scratch. But it would be quite an enjoyable and rewarding and not just from a financial point of view.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#10 by phil ( deleted ) , Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:10 pm

Yes I can just see me trotting around Cannon Hill or Sutton Park driving one of these. Though I think this one seems a little overloaded.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#11 by phil ( deleted ) , Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:20 pm

SB

One of the first buses to run along the Bristol Rd, this early 1870 photo shows a Birmingham Omnibus Co bus near its terminus at The Gun Barrels Public House. The fare being 4d on the inside and 3d on the outside. This was a half hourly service. There was a four times a day service through to Selly Oak for this the fare was 6d inside and 4d outside. The service was replaced in 1874 by a horse drawn tram service using a standard gauge track.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#12 by Sheldonboy , Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:42 pm

Phil they look great the old horse buses don't they but I bet they were incredibly uncomfortable and shook the living doings out of you. SB


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#13 by phil ( deleted ) , Tue Feb 02, 2010 9:17 pm

SB

Well the are wooden wheels. I suppose it would have a lot to do with the surface of the road and how well they were sprung. I have to say that I have rode several times in old horse drawn carriages and it was never a rough ride, and they have wooden wheels.

Phil


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#14 by Sheldonboy , Tue Feb 02, 2010 9:39 pm

There's a thought, wooden wheels. Where would the world be without the skills of the wheelwright. They were the village carpenters, made farm wagons, furniture and would even make your coffin for you (if you were poor). SB


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RE: Birmingham Transport

#15 by mikejee , Tue Feb 02, 2010 10:46 pm

I don't think it would just be the wooden wheels, but a combination of wooden wheels plus rough roads. You can see from photographs that at the turn of the century or just before, some roads were not that smooth' I would think that even the old stone setts would make a bit of a rough ride if the rim of the wheel was not sheathed in rubber. I must admit the only time i've ridden in a horse drawn carraige it was on a tarmac road

mike

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