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Nautical Terms

#1 by Voltman , Tue Jul 27, 2010 6:41 pm

Nautical Terms
I have always been fascinated by how much of our everyday language is influenced by our country’s nautical history. We use nautical terms to describe so many things, often without giving a second thought to what the terms really mean.

This thread is a place for us to compile a list of all such nautical terms in common usage today, however and where ever we may find them, along with a description of what they meant to the seafaring generations of long ago.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
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Last edited 07.27.2010 | Top

RE: Nautical Terms

#2 by Voltman , Tue Jul 27, 2010 6:51 pm

Three sheets to the wind

When three or more sheets, which was the name for the ropes that held the sails in place, became detached from their sails, then the sails would flap about in the wind and the ship would wander about as if drunk.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
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RE: Nautical Terms

#3 by Deleted User , Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:51 pm

Ahoy there........saying hello

I don't think I know any [Help]



RE: Nautical Terms

#4 by Sheldonboy , Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:57 pm

POSH is a Nautical Term ............ Port Out Starboard Home.


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RE: Nautical Terms

#5 by Voltman , Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:29 pm

That's so you get the sunny side of the ship on both journey's.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
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RE: Nautical Terms

#6 by berniew , Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:42 pm

Splice the mainbrace means to start drinking I think , I like this expression

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RE: Nautical Terms

#7 by phil ( deleted ) , Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:00 pm

Not until the sun is over the yardarm I believe?


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RE: Nautical Terms

#8 by mikejee , Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:02 pm

I always thought port out, starboard home was so you got the coolest side of the ship, but then I can never work out which is which anyway


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RE: Nautical Terms

#9 by phil ( deleted ) , Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:06 pm

I think port is to the left, is that not why Port is always passed to the left at the dinner table? In our house it usually goes to who grabs it first.

Phil


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RE: Nautical Terms

#10 by Voltman , Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:31 pm

Mikejee,

On transatlantic travel, so when you go west to New York the Port side is facing South into the sun and when you come back East, the Starboard side is facing the sun.
When we crossed the atlantic a couple of years ago we chose the port side specifically for that reason, and glad we did, it was January and very cold but the sunshine was lovely.
But, you are probably right about the original source of the phrase, as the same rule when applied to ships to India did provide shade instead of sun.
VM


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
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RE: Nautical Terms

#11 by Voltman , Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:37 pm

Splice the Mainbrace was an order from the top to repair a large rope. This needed a long spliced repair as opposed to a short lumpy splice, or a knot, due to the route the rope took through the rigging.
Here is what the Navy say...

"Splice the Mainbrace"
An extra issue of one-eight of a pint of rum to each officer and man of an over the age of 20 who desires to take the rum: lemonade to others. The rum is mixed with water into grog for all ratings below Petty Officer. Ratings marked "T" in the ship's books may draw rum or grog or lemonade when the main brace is spliced; no money payment in lieu is allowable. See Q.R. & A.I. 4923. The order to make this extra issue may be given only by the Sovereign (or a member of the Royal Family) or by the Admiralty. Splicing the main brace is the only occasion when officers may be issued with service rum.
The name arose from the reward customarily given in sailing ships to men who carried out the task of splicing the main brace. As the main brace had to be led through blocks, a long splice (as opposed to a short splice or a knot) had to be made in it when repair was necessary, and the ship had to remain on the one tack until the job was completed. Thus the work had to be done at great speed and in whatever conditions prevailed at the time since the ship could not be steered effectively with a broken main brace. The ship's best Able Seamen normally were chosen to do the work under the supervision of the Boatswain. The VICTORY's main brace was of 5" hemp.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
Voltman

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RE: Nautical Terms

#12 by Voltman , Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:39 pm

The Navy again....

The Sun is over the Yard Arm (or Fore Yard) Naval officers' expression meaning "It is time for a drink", it is bad form to have a drink on board before sun is over the yard arm, i.e. approaching noon. The last word of this phrase is more correctly FOREYARD than YARDARM.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
Voltman

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Posts: 18.034
Date registered 02.24.2010

Last edited 07.28.2010 | Top

RE: Nautical Terms

#13 by berniew , Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:24 pm

Cut and run I think is originally a nautical term

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RE: Nautical Terms

#14 by Voltman , Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:44 pm

Cut and Run is to make a quick departure.
The sailing ships would tie the rolled up sails onto the yards with light ropes which they would cut if the need arose, the sails would drop and the ship was away.


Anyone informed that the universe is expanding and contracting in pulsations of eighty billion years has a right to ask, “What’s in it for me?”
Peter De Vries (b. 1910)
http://brummiestalking.org.uk/

 
Voltman

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Posts: 18.034
Date registered 02.24.2010


RE: Nautical Terms

#15 by berniew , Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:12 pm

Was no room to swing a cat nautical VM

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